Lt Jonathan Layton

Interested in joining the 1st Battalion? Want to know more about 95th (Rifle) Regiment of Foot? Want to discuss some interesting fact or historical reference relating to the Regiment? We welcome any information that will enhance our understanding and knowledge of this world-reknown regiment. Post your questions in here and we will endeavour to answer them.
User avatar
Adrian P
Fellow Re-enactor
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 9:38 pm
Contact:

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by Adrian P » Wed Nov 11, 2009 4:30 am

From Lionel S. Challis's "Peninsula Roll Call"

http://www.napoleon-series.org/research ... 00/458.pdf

Is this the item you refered to Ian as it does state Peninsula service till Apr 1813?
Adrian Philpott
12th Light Dragoons

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Wed Nov 11, 2009 8:40 am

Yes! Challis had really done his homework...

Ian

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Wed Nov 18, 2009 8:39 am

Sorry for the delay in providing more details of Lt Jonathan Layton's life outside his service years.

Jonathan Layton was named after his father’s elder brother Jonathan (1742-1801), who was the squire/copyholder of Reedham Hall (Norfolk) until his death. Young Jonathan was born in Clippesby, the second son and third child of Charles Layton (1744-1791) and Catherine Lawne (1755-1837), and was baptized there on 24th February 1782. He was followed by seven more siblings - the last, Henry, being born only a year before his father died. The family lived at Clippesby Hall, as had his paternal grandparents Charles (1715-1772) and Elizabeth Pritchard (1716-1772). After the untimely death of her husband, Charles in 1791 (aged only 48), Catherine and her 9/10 small children may well have gone to live in Reedham Hall with her bachelor brother-in-law, the elder Jonathan. Upon his death in 1801 her children inherited most of his property and fortune, but were mostly under-age. The eldest son Charles took over the largest properties (Reedham, Salhouse, etc), while his brothers received smaller estates and/or cash legacies. Catherine apparently moved to Caister-next-Yarmouth (Caister on Sea), inherited by her youngest son Henry, as the property appears in her name on the inclosure map of 1802, or she may have stayed on at Reedham until her sons successively attained their majority (age of 21).

According to the Military List of 1805, Jonathan (1782-1836), the second son, began his military career as an Ensign in the Norfolk East Militia (15 May 1804) and was soon commissioned as Lieutenant on 22 Aug 1804 (aged 22); he became a militia Captain on 3 Sept 1806. His income must have derived mainly from the rents in Salhouse (a small estate owned by Hawes in 1798/9 but purchased by his uncle), which he had retained after inheriting it in 1801 from his wealthy uncle Jonathan (1742-1801). However, his older brother Charles sold his larger Salhouse estate in 1802 and, while living at Reedham Hall, became interested in acquiring further land and estates, including the two manors of Cantley, where he also purchased the lordship title from William Morriss (farmer and copyhold tenant of Cantley Uphall) on 25th August 1815, thereby becoming squire of both Cantley and Reedham.

The London Gazette 29 Sept 1807 records that Lieutenant Joseph Orr was to be Captain in the Norfolk East Militia, vice (replacing) Layton, who had resigned (dated September 4th). At the PRO Kew, the series WO 31 (Commander in Chief’s Memoranda) shows that militia Captain Jonathan Layton had transferred to the 95th Regiment of Foot (Riflemen, or Rifle Corps), 1st Battalion and at the age of 25 he was appointed to the rank of Second Lieutenant (without purchase), gazetted on 5 Nov 1807. The following year he was already under fire but on a personal level, being involved in an unfortunate duel with pistols:

An account of the trial was reported in The Ipswich Journal, Sat. Aug 13, 1808 (issue no 3919) under the heading ‘Wednesday Post’:
“At Chelmsford Assizes, on Saturday [4th Aug?] …
… Jonathan Layton, Lieut. Cane, and Lieut. Hallon [William Hallen], of the 95th regiment, were indicted for the murder of Brodie Grant, Captain in the same regiment. There was no evidence whatsoever but that of two countrymen, who saw 4 gentlemen go under the Cliff at Dovercourt, Harwich. They heard a firing of pistols, and saw 3 return. On going to the spot they found a man dead on the beach; but they did not know the persons of the prisoners. They were of course acquitted; but Lord Ellenborough observed; that there had been no pains used to prepare the prosecution, no Council having been employed. The County ought, his Lordship said, to make further enquiries in such cases. The death of a man ought not to be passed over with so little investigation. …”
Being in Harwich, he should have embarked for Sweden with part of the 1st Battalion and other forces led by Sir John Moore, arriving Gothenburg 7 May 1808. However, still pending trial, he was not permitted to join the expedition. He didn’t miss much as there was no action, only drills and exercises.

After two stints of service in the Peninsula ((Nov 1808 - Jan 1809, & July 1809 - Apr 1813), Jonathan returned to the depot in Kent for unknown reasons. In 1815 he was wounded in the wrist and side at Quatre Bras but is not listed among the wounded - so maybe the wounds were considered minor, enabling him to retain command of Charles Beckwith's 10th company at Waterloo?

The 1/95th remained abroad until 1818, but Jonathan evidently tired of the boring duties and transferred to the 93rd Regiment on half pay (H. p. 21st May, 1818), exchanging with Lt William Fraser, and receiving the difference (London Gazette 6 June 1818)

On 1 May 1825 Jonathan Layton married Emily Mingay (from near Salhouse?) in St Marylebone, New Church, London. Did he still receive any income from his small estate in Salhouse, Norfolk, or had he sold it?

In 1827 Jonathan was already in economic difficulties and was imprisoned as an insolvent debtor. His petition for relief was heard at Reading, in the county of Berkshire on the 8th day of October 1827, at nine o’clock in the forenoon (London Gazette issue 18396, 14 Sept 1827):

“Jonathan Layton, formerly of Reedham-Hall, Norfolk, late of Hermitage-House, Berkshire, a Lieutenant in the Army on half-pay.”

On 27 Dec 1828, when his half pay apparently ceased (10 years?, after a total of 21 years of service. What about the two years extra pay and pension promised to the victors of Waterloo?), Jonathan and Emily were living at No 47 London Street, Fitzroy Square, London; during the previous 5 years he had lived at Hermitage House & Reading, both in the county of Berkshire, and at No 24 Upper Marylebone St., Fitzroy Square, London (Jonathan Layton’s service record at Kew, WO 25/765/9. First page in the folio, urgently needs preserving as it is damaged through excessive handling).

His financial troubles were not over, however, and in 1835 his petition was again to be heard - this time at the Court House, in Portugal Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, on Saturday the 13th day of June 1835, at Nine o’clock in the Forenoon (London Gazette issue 19272, 22 May 1835):

“Jonathan Layton, formerly of No. 47, London-Street, Fitzroy-Square, then of William-Street, Hampstead-Road, Middlesex, then of Whitecross-Street Prison, London, and late of Frederick-Street, Regent’s-Park, Middlesex, Lieutenant in His Majesty’s Army, on half-pay”

Was this strictly true? Was he really still on half-pay? His sojourn in the White Cross Prison must have been in relation to his earlier insolvency and debts.

Jonathan Layton died 3rd July 1836 (aged 54), and was presumably buried somewhere in Marylebone/Regents Park; evidently he was not buried in Reedham. Was he among the 600 or so burials moved from inside the church to another cemetery?

18 July 1836 his widow, Emily Layton, claimed the balance (was there any?) of his half pay – no will left? She was then living at 6 Frederic Street, Regent’s Park. In the 1841 census she was possibly a domestic servant (35 rounded down) in the household of a merchant, James Duff, at 13 Harley Street, Marylebone. She remarried OND 1842 to William Mines, a retired oilman, and in 1851 they were living at 1 Windsor Cottage, Tavestock Road, Hampstead (she was then 47 and he was 49).

Well, that's about all I have. Apart from the Waterloo medal issued in 1816, he would also have been entitled to the campaign medal and five clasps for his Peninsular War service. However, they were not issued until 1847, long after his death in 1836, which explains why his name is missing from the medal rolls.

Hope this is of interest. Any comments or extra information would be much appreciated!

Cheers,

Ian G. Layton

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 11:26 am

Does anyone know anything about the Late Issue Waterloo Medal awarded to those who fought between the 16th and 18th June 1815? It appears to have been distributed later, to those who were wounded (in hospital?) and who were not with their battallion/company at the time of the first issue. What were the actual dates of the first and late issues?

Lieutenant Jonathan Layton was wounded in the wrist and side at Quatre Bras on the 16th, but it seems impossible to know whether or not he was present and in command of the 10th company (Beckwith's) on the 18th. Does anyone have access to the pay list that immediately followed the final battle? If Jonathan was indeed hospitalised then I presume he would not figure in the 10th company's roll?

Cheers,

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 2:03 pm

Hi, I may have given the wrong signals, but I do know that Jonathan received a Waterloo Medal (he is on the list just cited). However, according to Caldwell & Cooper's "Rifle Green at Waterloo" he did receive a Late Issue Medal and I was trying to find out more about the two, apparently separate, issues. Did the medals differ in any way and what was the time interval between their issue?

Cheers

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Wed Mar 24, 2010 10:27 am

Greetings from northern Sweden,

I shall be in England and hope to visit the PRO at Kew between 4th to 7th May - hopefully to find out more about the military career of my remote ancestor, Jonathan Layton. If anyone (perhaps Adrian?) has any tips on which series of records I should look at, to clarify his return home from the Peninsula in 1813 and his participation or non-participation in the actual battle of Waterloo (he was wounded in the wrist and side at Quatre Bras), I would be most grateful to hear from you.

My off-forum email address is <ian.layton3@gmail.com>

Cheers, Ian

User avatar
Adrian P
Fellow Re-enactor
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 9:38 pm
Contact:

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by Adrian P » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:36 pm

Good news on you coming over to have a look :D

The records office is a bit hit and miss and on several occasions I have spent all day there and found little..........it can be very frustrating. Mainly I suppose because there is so much there. On my last visit I read a ledger containing letters going backwards and forwards to the uniform board and they were discussing the use of waterproofed greatcoats for units in Canada :shock:

You will need to bring proof of ID (drivers licence etc) and they will issue you with a readers card. The staff are helpful and will point you in the right direction but from experience they aren't familiar with everything so may take a bit of digging.

The set of files you are after are marked WO (for War office), and from memory all the monthly returns are in WO13. That is probably the easiest way to see his name on the roster during the Waterloo period. It's worth remembering that the returns are not listed by engagement/ battles but by monthly periods.

Service records are there but I have yet to look at them so I can't help you with that one.

Good luck :D
Adrian Philpott
12th Light Dragoons

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Thu Mar 25, 2010 6:42 am

Thanks Adrian, once again, for your advice. I have been to the PRO many moons ago, so I am aware of the bun fight to get documents!

Cheers,

Ian

User avatar
Adrian P
Fellow Re-enactor
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat Mar 14, 2009 9:38 pm
Contact:

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by Adrian P » Thu Mar 25, 2010 7:40 pm

I do have a copy of a letter dated 17th Oct 1811 which gives the name and address (in London) of the supplier of the newly invented cap. Maybe they're are talking about the 'Belgic' cap but then the Light Dragoons' headress changed at the same time so who knows :shock:
Adrian Philpott
12th Light Dragoons

Gareth++123
Whisperer
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:41 pm

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by Gareth++123 » Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:41 pm

I am presently working on Simmons major journal of Waterloo quoted briefly by Mark Urban.It is due to be published fully in my Waterloo Archive 4

He confirms that Layton commanded the company at QB but does not mention him at Waterloo at all. However he states that Layton's injuries were minor and I therefore believe that he continued to command the company at Waterloo. Here are the quotes.

Embarked at Dover on the 25th April 1815 on board of the Wensleydale packet, the company was commanded by Captain Beckwith , brevet Lieutenant Colonel, and the following officers viz Lieutenant Layton , Lieutenant Stewart , Lieutenant Simmons, 2nd Lieutenant Wright

Lieutenant Layton commanded the company, Lieutenant Stewart, Lieutenant Simmons, Lieutenant Felix, 2nd Lieutenant Wright, Mr Smith Volunteer, these officers constituted the mess, for whom I had to provide.

Lieutenant Layton who was close to me received a hit in the wrist & side by musket balls, the wounds were not severe, but they bled freely. I tore off part of the sleeve of his shirt & wound it round his wrist, telling him to go to the doctor. ‘George Simmons you must hit the fellow first, I see him now pointing with his finger.’
I took a rifle, laid down & fired over the stump of a tree, several men were doing the same from the embankment. I knew some of them were punished because they began to hide themselves. After firing in this way 3 or 4 shots a sergeant said ‘Fire my rifle Sir’,
I sprang up & said ‘Fire it yourself.’ Layton entreated me to do so, not this time. The sergeant then placed his rifle over the stump, I pointing at (almost bent over him) a man at the corner of a wall. At this moment a round shot struck him in the face, dashing his head into long shreds or ribbons, throwing him backwards a distance of 10 yards. It was quite marvellous, his smashed head did not touch me, only a little sprinkling of blood. Layton & Felix were close by [&] observed ‘George Simmons, you really have a charmed life.

All the Best

Gareth Glover

Gareth++123
Whisperer
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:41 pm

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by Gareth++123 » Mon Jan 31, 2011 8:49 pm

P. S. Reference late issue Waterloo Medals.

I was lucky enough a number of years ago to browse the original Waterloo Medal list at the Royal Mint in Llantrisant (I believe it is now held at Kew). It would seem that the lists sent in by regiments were not always correct and certainly not consistent in their approach; some including the dead others not etc. A number of medals were issued beyond the issue date of 1816 (memory serves me that the last listed was in the 1830's), some to families of deceased, others wounded or missing not on the return etc and even some for lost originals. There was no official re-issue date; they simply issued out spare medals (all cast together in the original batch) to claims as they came in and were accepted as genuine.

Gareth Glover

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Mon Jan 31, 2011 10:48 pm

Gareth! Many thanks indeed for keeping an eye open for Lt Jonathan Layton. I had not expected to get any further with his career and exploits and I really needed to get George Simmon's own words rather than relying on Mark Urban's words. I am therefore most grateful for your verbatim extracts from the original journals and for your useful observations on the issuing of the Waterloo medal.
Cheers,
Ian Layton

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:05 am

More details about the life of Jonathan Layton keep cropping up! On retiring on half pay in 1818, he appears to have returned to Reedham Hall in Norfolk, where his older brother Charles had lived until 1817 - continuing the family's ties with the property, dating from the 1730s. In 1822, however, he held a sale of livestock, farm implements, furniture, etc., and was no longer the tenant in 1823. Among his possessions up for auction were four peacocks, three Spanish asses, a rifle gun, mahogany loo table ('loo' was a popular card game), mahogany card tables, etc., which give some idea of his lifestyle and may well account for his economic downfall.

One wonders if he had brought the Spanish asses from the Peninsula in 1813, when he returned to England, and if his rifle gun was the one he might have used in the Peninsula and at Waterloo? Or did officers only have pistols and swords?

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:26 am

After a long silence, I have at last something more to add to the tale of Lt Jonathan Layton of the 1st battalion.

Named silver campaign medals (Waterloo 1815) were awarded for the first time to all men and officers that took part in the Waterloo battles and were distributed in early 1816. Lt Jonathan Layton must have received one but, possibly because of his wounds, he did not appear on the original medal roll (as was the case with a number of other officers and men). However, he appears on the late claims roll 5th February 1818; BUT, he is shown as ‘James Laton’, so his medal rim could possibly be named as this, and the name of the Regiment may well be ‘Late 95th, Rifle Brigade’ as a number of others were. I doubt he was pleased to receive his medal with the wrong christian name and misspelt surname!

Does a collector still have this medal? Jonathan may have pawned it when he was hard up in London!

Cheers

NOTYAL37
Anti-Tattler
Posts: 21
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:17 am

Re: Lt Jonathan Layton

Post by NOTYAL37 » Sun Mar 15, 2015 12:26 pm

The Views counter seems to have gone berserk... Nothing more to add unfortunately.

Post Reply